Monday, 28 February 2011

A-Z #45: City of Angels

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em


#45 - City of Angels 

Why did I buy it?

We come across another film I have managed to 'gain' when combining my own collection with Sarah's. City of Angels is a remake of Wim Wenders classic film Wings of Desire. Though I have only seen the former, I am keen to hunt down the latter at some point.

Why do I still own it?
We have to define what a good romance is. I think City of Angels qualifies because like Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind it is set within a context that does not exist - angels do not exist. But, by the same token, the unrequited love of one person over another is expressed in this film in a sincere and respectable way. Unlike Andrew Lincoln falling for Kiera Knightley in Love, Actually the love here is not a case of simply 'getting over it' (which, as soon as Knightley got it on with Lincoln's best friend, he should have moved on rather than simply holding a candle until post-wedding - !!! - he perves on her from a distance, eventually confronting her himself, corssing the line, by professing his love through false carol-singers. Nb, I do actually like Love, Actually), City of Angels is also a desire to be close to someone and to feel the person with you, close to you. I need to watch the original, I know that, but until I do - City of Angels stands tall amongst the romances in the collection.

Should I get the original Wings of Desire? Should I sell this copy of the much-more-literal City of Angels?

Large Association of Movie Blogs


Sunday, 27 February 2011

The LAST Simon and Jo Film Show: 27/02/2011 Danny Boyle's 'Frankenstein' and Drive Angry

Unfortunately, The Simon and Jo Film Show has now transmitted it's last podcast. Over 70 episodes, 5 Bourne Brain Baffler's, 5 London Film Festival podcasts, 2 special editions (to see the episode-list click here) and here we are with a final episode.

We record live from outside the National Theatre and, indeed, it does get windy - so apologies for that. But, no film news or box-office this week simply discussion on the National Theatre's production of 'Frankenstein' directed by Danny Boyle and starring Johnny Lee Miller (Trainspotting) and Benedict Cumberbatch (BBC's Sherlock Holmes TV series). Details about the cinema-release of this play is here.

We then run through our Oscar-picks and what we think may win, only to finish with a visit to the club and then review Drive Angry starring Nicholas Cage, Amber Herd and William Fichtner.

The blog will still be running but, alas, the end has come to a podcast which we have always enjoyed making and thank all our listeners for putting up with our ramblings and banter!

Links

Facebook-er of the week is Luke Owen who writes for Flickering Myth and created 'The Collecters Room' and can now be found on IMDB.
Twitter-er of the week is Jeff Brandt - aka jtbrandt23
Blog of the Week is Top 10 Films, run by Dan.

Thanks to listeners who have always supported us, namely:
Fletch/Mr Cabin/Dylan at Blog Cabins
Shannon the Movie Moxie
Liam Crosbie
Every listener at Flickering Myth

Our favourite cinemas in London:

Music

To go off with a bang and, as there is no music available for 'Frankenstein', I have picked my favourite tracks by Underworld - one of my favourite artists - who also composed the score for the 'Frankenstein' production at the National Theatre.

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

A-Z #44: Citizen Kane

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em

#44 - Citizen Kane 

Why did I buy it?

C'mon - this is The greatest film of all-time. This is according to Sight & Sound, Cahiers du cinéma 100 films, Kinovedcheskie Russia Top 10, Romanian Critics Top 10, Time Out Magazine Greatest Films and Roger Ebert claims it as "the greatest movie ever made". It was also the double-disc edition which I found for £4 in Oxfam - this included an incredible documentary hosted by Barry Norman as to why it is deemed so good.

Why do I still own it?
 
I have watched it multiple times and it truly is a masterpiece. In terms of what is fascinating about watching it now - Orson Welles performance as Kane during multiple different points in his life, the story that is hinged on what the term 'rosebud' means - this 'revelation' is as important (if not moreso) that Luke finding out who his Dad is in The Empire Strikes Back.
 
On top of this, this film combined multiple cinematic elements which, nowadays, is taken for granted. Deep-focus, special effects, impossible zoom-in's and obscure camera-angles all feature in this film. If this was the only film in your collection, you would be content (Obviously, you would really need to visit the shop soon and  buy more DVD's).

Maybe everyone is wrong - and it is crap... therefore it should be sold. What do you think? Do you rate Citizen Kane so high?

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Friday, 25 February 2011

A-Z #43: Chinatown

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em


#43 - Chinatown

Why did I buy it?

One of those 'classic' pieces of cinema and one of two 'most-important' film in Roman Polanski's back-catalogue (the other being Rosmary's Baby). Additionally, I am a big fan of all films of the Gangster genre, and so this undercover-thriller was a film I was destined to purchase and watch many years ago

Why do I still own it?

The first time I watched this, I did not own it. It was onlt a number of years later when I seemed to constantly find myself coming across the film again and again. It was nominated for Best Picture (and nominated for another eleven Academy Awards, but only taking one away for Towne's Best Screenplay) and losing out to The Godfather Part II - though incidently it did win Best Motion Picture at the Golden Globes. It crops up for disection within Syd Field's Screenplay: The Foundations of Screewriting. And, as the film-noir of the seventies, it always stands out from the crowd for its dark subject matter and grotesque ending. I only watched it recently again, prior to watching Polanski's The Ghost and it still stands as an incredible film - with incredible performances from Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway and John Huston. 

Maybe I am wrong, maybe there is a reason it didn't pick up the awards?

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Thursday, 24 February 2011

Top 5 Best Picture Oscar Winners

I have professed my distaste for many a Top 5 list in the past but there are always exceptions to the rule and, having watched a fair few of the Best Picture Oscar winners I feel I am in a good position to state the Top 5 Best Picture Winners, according to Screen Insight is ...

5. The Departed

Martin Scorsese should've won an Oscar much earlier in his career - losing out to Dances with Wolves when he had Goodfellas was shocking. The Departed is proof that filmmakers can not only remake a foreign film exceptionally well, but additionally, if they are good enough they will eventually win an Oscar. An incredible cast, a hugely entertaining film - this is an example when Oscar gets it right and everyone who watches the film will agree with their decision

4. Annie Hall

Oscar is not a big fan of comedy. I am a huge fan of Woody Allen and Annie Hall is much more accessible than the vast majority of his work. Even with Manhattan, Woody Allen has the semi-pretentiousness of a black-and-white palette whilst one of the female love interests to Woody is a 14-year-old girl. You get none of this in Annie Hall, just some incredible jokes and some facsinating innovative techniques in use - subtitles to expain what the couple really mean, tthe ghost-like Diane-Keaton leaving the bed as Woody tries to seduce her whilst the opening and closing direct-to-camera monologues show how great a showman Woody Allen truly is.

3. Casablanca

Having recently mentioned this on the A-Z, there is only so much to say. It still remains a classic with stunning performances from everyone involved. Like the best classics - Gone with the Wind, Night of the Living Dead and Easy Rider - the end of Casablanca can never be remade, retouched or improved upon. It was made at a specific time, representing a period with actors that could only deliver those specific lines at that time in history.

2. West Side Story

Musicals and Epics dominated fifties cinema. Other winners during that time period were The Sound of Music, My Fair Lady, Lawrence of Arabia and Ben-Hur. On one level, West Side Story is a musical which is very personal as Tony and Maria fall in love - but set on an epic backdrop as the two families are against each other. A remake of-sorts (based on Romeo and Juliet) it has energy, pace and tragedy. One of my favourite musicals... and one of my favourite Oscar winners.

1. The Godfather/The Godfather Part II

You can't separate them first off. The only sequel to win Best Picture is only as good as it is because of its predescessor. Francis Ford-Coppola famously turned the films down when first approached. Mario Puzo needed the money. Al Pacino was unknown and Marlon Brando bailed on the sequel. So many stories behind it, so many personal connections and I think it is all these incredible facets that make the film even more watchable. It has class, it has style and it deserves its Best Picture win. As it also deserves its place as one of the Best Films of All Time.

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.
Large Association of Movie Blogs

Wednesday, 23 February 2011

The Critical Introduction to Film... (Part 2)

I am currently reading Film: A Critical Introduction by Tom Wallis and Maria Pramaggiore. As I read each chapter, I shall write the few thoughts I have...

Chapter 2: The Orchestration of Detail

Continuing from the last blog post regarding interpretation and expectations, the next focus is detail. Motifs and parrallels are details placed to enhance understanding and ensure themes are brought to the forefront of the story. Wallis and Pramaggiore state "Motifs can also encourage spectators to compare and contrast characters, plot events, objects of situations". The book refers to Citizen Kane and the motif of 'rosebud'. Further to this, you could add to the list of important motifs other examples such as the graffitied cement-section in Mystic River, the triangular formation that is built obsessively in Close Encounters of the Third Kind or the black monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey. These motifs focus our attention on what is important - and what we should think about. For example, what is important about the cement-section in Mystic River? The connection to childhood, the rebellious aspects of their youth dictating their adulthood - the moment whereby their lives changed forever through Dave's abduction.

Motif's signify multiple reminders of a theme, whereas parrallels may simply be the same sequence repeated or a shot which clearly asks for a comparison between two characters. So, we can consider the repeated tracking shot in Shaun of the Dead as Simon Pegg walks from his house to the newsagent - in the first instance people act like zombies, though the second time people actually are zombies. Another parrallel may be how the shot that finishes Smokin' Aces forces you to see the two comatose-criminals sat on either side of Reynolds character and we compare the two - are they important? No? Then pull the plug Reynolds. (Note how it then zooms in on Reynolds as the two criminals are not important - it is Reynolds who is important). Wallis and Pramaggiore finish this section by noting how "paying attention to repetition, motifs and parrallels can help viewers to recognise a film's deeper structure".

The details often take place at important points - such as contrasting the start and end of a film (the feather in Forrest Gump). Sometimes they structure specific turning points in the film (Every time Cobb exits a dream, again, he checks his Totem in Inception). But even camerawork can dictate the end of sequences - potentially fading out to signal the end of a sequence (I find this happens alot when huge-chunks of time separates each section, following the fade out with text "Massachussets, 1895" before continuing with the story)
Having just mentioned 'huge-chunks of time', sometimes the non-chronological structure of a story is set-up to focus your attention on different aspects. The repetition of a feature often beginning these sequences to clarify the time-period and where the sequence takes place.

Its fair to say that, at the moment, anything presented on the screen is not a happy-accident. Filmmakers choose to set-up different parrallels and motifs to make meaning and ensure that the film is structurally poetic. Having said that, there is many articles on how Tron:Legacy has much more depth to it than what may first be the case - comparing the Sam Flynn/Kevin Flynn storyline to Hamlet. Personally, it is worth being wary that meaning can be found in film, despite not beng originally intended. I don't think this is too much of a problem, as an audience, we can interpret Art in whatever way we believe is appropriate and once a film is made and exhibited, it is out of the personal domain and in the publics hands. Though meaning may not have been intended, there may be subconsious themes that speak through the film that the filmmaker was unaware of. 


Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Tuesday, 22 February 2011

A-Z #42: Chicken Run

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em




#42 - Chicken Run 

Why did I buy it?

This goes way back. Again, a huge bunch of films were purchased in the hey-day of DVD. Chicken Run was one of these films. I remember the exceptional sales it had around Christmas time and the huge British-Success which was Nick Parks animation studios going 'feature'-length. Unlike the various Wallace and Gromit shorts that preceded it.

Why do I still own it?

Because, if I'm honest, I don't think its bad enough to sell. I need a little bit of balance to my Disney-only family films - and this is one of them. Then again, I don't look at it and think "this is incredible" - in fairness, I think its a good film. I would have to replace it with another family-friendly film and the question is - which one? There is nothing as unique as claymation chickens and, with Mel Gibson, there is a nice Hollywood touch.

Can You Recommend the Family-friendly film I should have instead if Chicken Run?
Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Monday, 21 February 2011

A-Z #41: Chicago

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em



#41 - Chicago 

Why did I buy it?

I didn't buy this one either - Sarah did. But had no problem at all with the purchase - again, Best Picture winner following on the heels of a musical-rennaissance of sorts as Moulin Rouge that preceded it and the multiple musicals that followed it.

Why do I still own it?
 
Again, this isn't mine to sell, but I must admit that I liked it. It is a strong musical and has some stunning musical numbers. The sexy and sassy nature of the story made the film ripe for becoming a film - and the mafia/Chicago story ensured that the film did not automatically exclude male members of the audience ("I ain't gonna watch The Sound of Music"). Unlike, Moulin Rouge, the romance in this story is buried deep within a context consisting of celebrity, jails, sex and gangsters. Not bad considering Zellweger had only recently become a household name due to Bridget Jones's Diary. Made a lot of sense to follow up the frumpy Bridget Jones with the sassy Roxie Hart. I've yet to rewatch it, but when I did - I knew that this was the type of musical I liked.  
Maybe you know one better! Maybe I should swap it for that one? Comment below if you think so!

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Sunday, 20 February 2011

TSAJFS: 20/02/2011 Never Let Me Go/Shaun Of The Dead/Hot Fuzz

Beginning from Clapham Picturehouse - see picture - we recorded this show shortly after viewing Never Let Me Go directed by Mark Romanek and starring Carey Mulligan, Andrew Garfield and Kiera Knightley.

The usual news and coverage of the London Box-Office and we finish, keeping it British, with Edgar Wright's Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost.

Links

Facebook-er of the week is Mike Ballance - who preferred Hot Fuzz to Shaun of the Dead.
Twitter-er of the Week is Flickering Myth who, alongside bantering about Terminator and Arnie Films, also run a great blog which you can visit by clicking here...

Blogger-er of the Week is Cut the Crap Movie Reviews who, alongside reviwing some great films, additionally is beginning to cover some James Bond films - starting with Dr No and From Russia With Love.

Music

The breaks have the music from the Never Let Me Go soundtrack, which is available on itunes and amazon.com.

Though the last track features in Shaun of the Dead - referencing the use of the song in Dawn of the Dead. It's called 'The Gonk'. The soundtracks to Hot Fuzz and Shaun of the Dead do not seem to be available on itunes so you may have to buy them second-hand from Amazon.

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Saturday, 19 February 2011

A-Z #40: Changeling

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em


#40 - Changeling 

Why did I buy it?

I didn't - Thank you to Brother Graham/Bangor Rep, for the present this Christmas just gone. I have watched it at the cinema and, through Graham, I now own it. So it is officially part of the collection but have yet to watch the present itself.

Why do I still own it?

My view on this was mixed. I remember thinking it was a good film - first and foremost - but I had concerns. I recall that it was long. I recall it becoming a bit random - initially a child-is-lost story then flipping into a One-Flew-Over-The-Cockoo's-Nest-Story and then turning into a Horror. I will be watching it again to re-evalute my opinion, but I do love a good Eastwood film and so many people have told me how they thought it is incredible ... so, maybe those initial concerns will change on a second watch. We shall see...

Maybe I shouldn't give it a chance - should I sell it now before even a second watch?
  
Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Friday, 18 February 2011

A-Z #39: Catch Me If You Can

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em



#39 - Catch Me If You Can 

Why did I buy it?
Much like my first foray into the films of Hitchcock ("How can I call myself a fan of film if I haven't seen any Hitchcock?"), having finished watching a huge bunch of his films, I moved onto Spielberg with the same attitude. I tried to get the double discs and, initially, I had the intention to keep every DVD owning all of Spielberg's back-catalogue. But, alas, I bought 1941 and it was a really bad film - and I have no intention of watching it again, so I sold it.
Why do I still own it?

Whereas, having only watched Catch Me If You Can once, I know that it is a great film - and more importantly a film I would like to revisit. Catch Me If You Can and Gangs of New York were both released the same year - 2002 - and became the real breakout films for DiCaprio. Though he still looks quite young in this film, there is something very different about DiCaprio here and the DiCaprio we saw two years before in The Beach. For some reason we have teen-hearthrob DiCaprio beginning with Romeo+Juliet, Titanic and - for all the die-hard fans, What's Eating Gilbert Grape. I think this phase ended with The Beach - don't get me wrong, it's an okay film, but DiCaprio is sold as the hearthrob poster-boy (Yes, I will ignore Don's Plum. I haven't seen it but, lets be honest - who has?). 2002 marked the year he worked with Scorsese and Spielberg - the two giants in the cinema, only for DiCaprio to be constantly involved in exceptionally credible talent - his constant work with Scorsese, Ridley Scott and Body of Lies, the Oscar-nominated Blood Diamond.

This film is a great film with a great performance from Hanks and the awesome Chris Walken.

Do I need such a film? Is it good enough to own?

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Thursday, 17 February 2011

A-Z #38: Casper

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em


#38 - Casper 

Why did I buy it?

Ha ha! Of course I bought it. On a family trip to Ireland I watched this with young-bruv, Bangor/Bath-Rep, Graham alongside my cousins Brian and Connor. I had a great time and, because of the summer release, they marketed the hell out of it. Stickers were everywhere - McDonald's had their special toys and as a child I had a whole bunch of these things. I then bought it on video - one of about ten videos I ever owned (Nb. One video was Jurassic Park, one video was The Making of Jurassic Park, one video was The Making of Michael Jacksons 'Thriller' and... many more which we will come to in due course...) - and, though I watched it a fair few times as a kid, I was never sure if I only truly bought it on video because the Universal logo matched up with the other Universal logo's on Jurassic Park and The Little Rascals (My Sisters video...)

Why do I still own it?
 
Since I bought it on DVD, I have watched it and I do think it stands up. Bill Pullman is in there as Christina Ricci's Dad - who are both in mourning the loss of Ricci's Mum/Pullmans Wife. Eric Idle is randomly in the film as some strange side-kick to a husky-sounding woman whilst the music has a very memorable refrain. This is an example of one of those films that go right back to my young childhood and, as Casper turned out to be the blonde, white kid who wears white shirts ... I think I kinda thought I was little like him, except that instead of being a ghost, I was human and wore my white shirts to the school disco.
Is all this childhood-connection a lame-ass memory I should shift? Should I sell it the not-so-spooky film?

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Wednesday, 16 February 2011

A-Z #37: Casino Royale

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em


#37 - Casino Royale

Why did I buy it?

This is where this whole A-Z thing can get a bit problematic. I am a self-confessed huge 007 fan. When we reach boxsets, I can discuss in more depth where this love came from, but suffice to say, I bought Casino Royale day-of-release having watched it at the cinema in Reading.
Why do I still own it?

Funnily enough, it is actually a film that, in due course, will be sold - but only to be upgraded by that sweet Blu-Ray version. Fact is, currently this on DVD, on the shelf. It really is an incredible film and the free-running start set the bar incredibly high frm the get-go. Ironically, once everyone jumped on the Daniel Craig bandwagon, they all seemed to turn on Brosnan who, for what its worth, was the James Bond of the ninties - in the mould of action films such as Die Hard  and Speed. Daniel Craig is gritty and built in the mould of The Bourne Supremacy - which is not a bad thing.

A flawless film that deserves its place in everyone's collection. Unlike the follow-up Quantum of Solace ...

Maybe you disagree ... maybe I should get rid of it permanaently?

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Tuesday, 15 February 2011

A-Z #36: Casino

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em


#36 - Casino 

Why did I buy it?

As a huge fan of Goodfellas, this is apparently an unofficial sequel to it - starring Goodfellas actors Robert de Niro, Joe Pesci and host of others. The length of the film put me off for a long time - and I was never sure if it would be as Goodfellas - but I had to give it a try...

Why do I still own it?
I am keen to understand it better on multiple viewings. I have watched it once so far since I bought it, and I wasn't bowled over. I mean, I loved De Niro and Pesci. Sharon Stone was great, but it just seemed to drag on a little. Many friends love this film and, more importantly, the odd few rate it higher than Goodfellas, claiming it is underrated. So, with that in my mind, I have every intention to reanalyse the film. I do believe that Scorsese films generally get better on multiple viewings so I shall simply watch it again and I am hoping I will appreciate it more... but when will I watch it again... ?

Maybe thats not enough - maybe, once watched, I should trust my instinct and sell it on... what do you think?

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Monday, 14 February 2011

A-Z #35: Casablanca

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em




#35 - Casablanca 

Why did I buy it?

I did buy this without having seen it and only knowing the critical acclaim. Always seen as on of those untouchable 'Greatest Films of All Time', it was only a short film and I thought, sure, why not. A sweet double-disc, shiney-cardboard edition was released with insightful documentaries and, interestingly, a Looney Tunes homage called Carrotblanca.

Why do I still own it?
 
Because it truly is incredible. Since purchasing the film, way back in 2005, I have watched it mnay times and even - how perfect is this - watched it with Sarah for a Valentines Day evening of romance. The film is crammed full of classic lines - "Play it again, Sam" not one of them (historical factoid, he says "play it Sam" but at no point says the famous oft-quoted "Play it again, Sam") - such as "of all the bars in all the world..." etc, etc. Romanticand yet, I think, the film is incredibly masculine - the strong central Humphrey Bogart choosing to be without love, so she can have the life she wants.
 
To finish, I will quote a line that Peter Lorre delivers - my favourite character - to Bogie shortly before Bergman walks into Rick's bar:
 
 
Put on the accent, and sound as slimy as you can - and you have my favourite moment.
 
Maybe classics are not that important? Maybe this is vastly overrated? Is it really worth keeping?
  

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

“You know, Rick, I have many a friend in Casablanca, but somehow, just because you despise me, you are the only one I trust.”

Sunday, 13 February 2011

TSAJFS: 13/02/2011 True Grit/Inside Job/Animal Kingdom

So, first off, we shall now attempt to - every week - take a picture from the location we record from. This week, we watched our films from Clapham Picturehouse and so, a picture of Jo and I pre-viewing is attached.

This week, our main review is True Grit - the Coen's taking on a true Western in all its 1800's glory. Then we have the usual news and meeting-of-people in 'the club' before we run through the London box-office and new releases.

We finish with some incrdible coverage of Oscar nominated documnetary Inside Job - a favourite to win - and the Australian gangster movie: Animal Kingdom.

Links

Facebook-er of the week is my sis' Pauline for being the only person to comment on my 'whats-the-best-007-film' question. (Though, since then, Mark Harrison has commented...)

Twitter-er of the week is Emma Farley (she also has a blog - FINAL CUT) who singled Jo out on his anti-Kings-Speech stance. But alas, Jo stands far from her as he still is not convinced - seriously folks, try and convince him to see it. He won't listen to Emma Farley, Mad Hatter or I...

Finally, our blogger of the week is Jason Soto at Invasion of the B-Movies primarily due to his single facebook/twitter post about Justin Bieber - or, more importantly, his fiance Felicia - stating how we should ruin Justin Bieber fans movie-going experience

Music

All music is from Carter Burwell's soundtrack to True Grit - though finishing with Air Supply's track, as used in Animal Kingdom.

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Saturday, 12 February 2011

A-Z #34: Carlito's Way

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em



#34 - Carlito's Way 

Why did I buy it?

I had wanted to purchase this film for many years for multiple reasons: Brian De Palma, Pacino, Viggo Mortensen Pre-Lord-of-the-Rings, classic-Gangster film, etc. I remember watching the opening scenes in a Media Studies lesson many years ago - and analysing the use of camera and use of effects to show disorientation, etc. By chance, Good Friend Rob purchased this for me as a present in an Al Pacino boxset alongside Scent of a Woman, Scarface and Sea of Love.

Why do I still own it?
 
Because it is potentially better than Scarface. Seriously, Pacino's gangster-trying-to-gte-out is much more likable than Tony in Scarface. The visual style is more restrained with a more interesting context - whilst, though I love the excess-culture Scarface lives within, I'd much rather visit the world of Carlito than the world of Cocained-up Scarface.
Maybe you can only own one? Maybe I should shift this and keep Scarface?
  
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Friday, 11 February 2011

A-Z #33: Bullet Boy

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and understanding why I own the films... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em


#33 - Bullet Boy 

Why did I buy it?

I don't think I did actually. If I recall correctly, Sarah bought the film as part of her planning for a lesson at her school many years ago. I knew the film was set in East London - within a square mile of the school I currently teach at - so I was incredibly interested in the depiction of the children in the area whilst, additionally, as Saul Dibb researched the film by interviewing the kids in teh area, it obviously informed the film itself too.

Why do I still own it?

Its not mine to sell really - Sarah bought it - but I am glad we still own it. Though it has a strong moral compass - unlike Kidulthood - the conflicts and frustration seem true and thought through. Massive Attack provided a song of the same name for the film and the story is incredibly engaging - if only because I know a little about the context it is set within. It is an interesting perspective on the released-from-prison-story we have seen before (American History X, 25th Hour) as the primary focus is the influence of all the people and environment around the released convicts brother Curtis, who is young and impressionable.

As an interesting factoid, IMDB states that when it was sold to the BBC, they proposed the project as 'Kes with guns'. Great.

Should I sell it though? Not mine to give - and I think I might show this to school children myself at some point.

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

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Thursday, 10 February 2011

A-Z #32: Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and considering why I own the films at all ... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em


#32 - Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason 

Why did I buy it?

This was a present. Sarah does like the first one and I, strangely enough, know the first one pretty well. There was a slight element of intrigue as to where the franchise would go. I knew the bad reviews but, this is unlike a usual purchase. I bought it very late in the day and me - and Sarah - were nothing to do with some Bridget Jones 'hype'.

Why do I still own it?
 
I personally wish I didn't - but alas, Sarah and I joined collections and this is inevitably the price I pay. The more important question is: Why does Sarah sleep happily in the knowledge that this completely-flawed, rehash-of-the-previous-film, unintelligent mockery of rom-com, sit in her our collection? With that, she delivers two words - two words that, though I may not understand, I see her logic. Her answer is simple: Colin Firth.
 
Same reason why most men own Wild Things and why Tomb Raider sold so well on DVD. Nothing to do with story, innovative-use of technology or blistering-performances - just certain thing in our pants which dictates (ho ho) our choice of film...

Should I sell it though? No Can Do.

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

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Wednesday, 9 February 2011

A-Z #31: Bridget Jones's Diary

You can pick up hundreds of DVD's for a round-pound each - it doesn't matter. Its never about quantity, its about quality. A-Z is my way of going through my collection, from A-Z, and considering why I actually own the films... or you can tell me why I should sell 'em



#31 - Bridget  Jones's Diary

Why did I buy it?

I am completely responsible for this one. It is shocking and ridiculous that I bought this - but, alas, I did. Back in college, I watched it - with a bunch of girls - at the cinema. And maybe I was with the wrong crowd and maybe I was just a little bit too-much-in-touch with my feminine side, but I was under the impression that the film was good when I left the cinema. To make matters worse, I think, because worked at Woolworths, the huge quantity of people buying the DVD simply affected my judgement. I bought it and, as I recall, even upon watching the DVD at home, I was content with the purchase.

Why do I still own it?
 
I re-watched this film many years after the purchase - having stated for years that "its a good rom-com!" and that, I needed something of every genre, and I was content with this being in my collection as a representative for Romantic Comedies. So, again, I rewatched the film and wow. I don't know what I was thinking! This is completely for girls. In every possible sense of the word - I think a guy can get a lot out of Love, Actually (Liam Neeson in mourning, the little kid and his first-crush, Andrew Lincoln and his love for his best-friends wife... that unrequited love... guys relate to that stuff and we appreciate films that explore it) but Bridget Jones's Diary is not just rom-com - it is women-only rom-com. Akin to The Sweetest Thing and Sex and the City: The Movie. I tried to get rid of it but Sarah likes it too much to get rid of it.  
Should I sell it though? I'm not allowed to sell this film... despite my efforts.  

Remember - you can always email The Simon and Jo Film Show directly using this email: simonandjoshow@gmail.com
We are also on Twitter  and Facebook.

Large Association of Movie Blogs